How To Build A Bump Out Wall For Fireplace

If you’re planning to build a bump out wall in your living room, you’re likely going to need some help. There are lots of things that can go wrong with a DIY project like this, and this particular project requires a different set of skills from many common home renovations. In short: get the right tools for the job and read over these instructions carefully before getting started.

Before you start, mark out the bump out wall on your living room floor.

Before you start, mark out the bump out wall on your living room floor.

  • Make sure that you have all the right tools for the job.
  • Make sure you have all the right materials for the job.
  • Make sure you have all the right space for your project.
  • Make sure that you give yourself enough time to complete it successfully

Invest in a strapping gun and a compressor, as you’ll find them handy for the task at hand.

As you start to buy materials and tools, you’ll need a strapping gun and compressor.

The strapping gun is used to fasten the drywall to the ceiling joists above your fireplace, while the compressor can be used with all of your power tools (Nail guns, paint sprayers etc.). You’ll find that having these two items in your toolbox helps with many other projects as well.

Fasten the studs to the floor with screws with washers.

  • Use a stud finder to locate the wall studs in the floor and mark them with your framing square.
  • Attach metal connector plates to the back side of each stud, using screws as indicated on each plate’s instructions sheet (usually two per plate). This will allow you to easily attach your new wall studs later on without having to drill holes through them first.
  • Slide one end of each wood screw into a hole drilled in one corner of an existing wall stud (see photo), then bend it over by hand so that it catches on its own when you start driving it down into the flooring surface below (you can also use pliers for this step if you need more leverage). When finished attaching all three screws per connection point between old and new walls, turn over each board so that all four sides are exposed. Repeat steps 1 through 3 for every other remaining corner in between existing ones as well; once complete, place floorboards across all newly installed spots where desired widths meet up with existing ones.”

Drill through the bottom plate into the floor, making sure that you’re assembling this unit on a level surface.

You will want to make sure that you are assembling this unit on a level surface. This can be done by using a carpenter’s level, or if you don’t have one available, try making one out of wood. You can find them at any hardware store or online and they are generally fairly cheap. If you want to get the most accurate reading possible, pick up a laser level as well; it will allow you to measure multiple points at once rather than just the two opposite corners of your project (which is what would happen with just a normal spirit level).

To begin drilling through the bottom plate into the floor make sure that whatever drill bit size corresponds with the screws that came with your unit (usually 3/8″).

Attach a 2 x 4 to the existing wall using screws that go down into the floor.

Attach a 2 x 4 to the existing wall using screws that go down into the floor.

Use a screw gun or drill to drive screws through the 2x4s into the floor. Be sure each screw is level (horizontal) and plumb (vertical). Use a carpenter’s level, spirit level, torpedo level or laser level for this task if necessary.

Fasten 2 x 4s from one side of the new wall to the other side using metal connectors.

Fasten 2 x 4s from one side of the new wall to the other side using metal connectors. Connectors are a quick and easy way to join two pieces of wood together; they’re available at most hardware stores, and they’re cheap. You can also make your own connectors with scrap wood if you have a few extra minutes to spare. The fastening method is very straightforward: just drive nails or screws through the holes in the connector into each end of your 2x4s. Be sure to read all precautions on how not to damage yourself while working with these tools.

Connectors come in many different widths, so choose one that fits well with the size of your project and make sure it will fit through any small spaces between studs (if applicable). They are often metal but sometimes wooden, so you should check which type is appropriate for your needs before purchasing them

They usually come in packs of 2 or 4 units depending on what type you buy; it’s always important when buying materials like this that you take care not only about how much money they cost but also whether they’ll meet all necessary requirements once installed

Next, add another 2 x 4 to this frame, making sure it’s level before nailing it together with thick wood glue and metal connector plates.

Next, add another 2 x 4 to this frame, making sure it’s level before nailing it together with thick wood glue and metal connector plates. You can use a stud finder to locate any studs that might be in the way of your new bump-out wall.

Next, check your level again to make sure the two frames are still square with one another.

Now you’re ready to build out from these frames on all four sides until they meet at a right angle with each other. It’s best if you have an extra person helping hold things in place while you’re working (especially when drilling into walls).

Building a bump out wall can make a huge difference in your living room.

A bump out wall can be used to create additional space in your living room and other rooms. It can be used as a dining room or home office, or it can be used to make a reading nook or home theater. Bump outs are also great for making an awkward corner more usable by creating an L-shaped design.

Here’s how you do it:

Conclusion

While it may not seem like much at first, adding a bump out wall can make a big impact on your living room. It’s an easy way to add extra space for seating or storage without taking up any of your square footage. Plus, if you don’t want the shelf to be permanent (or if it isn’t needed all year round), then consider making it removable so that you can take off when not in use

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